AudiologyOnline Phone: 800-753-2160
Phonak Marvel 2.0 - September 2019

Phonak Faces of Audiology: Five minutes with Stacey Rich, Manager of Pediatrics at Phonak HQ

Stacey Rich, MClAud, CCP

October 4, 2019
Share:

Phonak employs more than 1,000 audiologists worldwide. The global team of audiologists has fit almost 2,000 subjects as part of the product validation process over the last 15 years, and typically works on around 60 studies a year. But there is more to global audiology excellence than just numbers. It’s the people that ultimately make the difference. They make sure that Phonak does not only develop innovative solutions, but – even more importantly – their main task is to ensure that these are translated into real-life user benefits. Their diverse educational and cultural backgrounds, know-how, dedication and passion are the driving force behind the company’s solutions, training and support. This is why Phonak has launched the Faces of Audiology initiative to introduce the people behind the scenes.

 

AudiologyOnline: Stacey, through the Faces of Audiology campaign, we have learned that you started your career as a sign language interpreter. When and why did you decide to move on to audiology? 

Stacey Rich: I started my career as a sign language interpreter in the US. I enjoyed that job a lot, and I can still remember some very special moments I experienced with my clients. For example, I got to interpret the birth of a child. But after a few years I realized that I was there to facilitate communication for a limited time. When I was in the room, the person who was deaf and the person who could hear were able to communicate easily. But the moment the appointment was over and I was no longer interpreting, communication became difficult again. I had taken an introduction to audiology class during my studies, which I really enjoyed, and so I decided to move on to audiology. I truly respect the deaf community and the job that sign language interpreters do, but for me this was a way to help improve communication for children with hearing loss and reduce the need to rely on an external person to facilitate communication.

AudiologyOnline: You have specialized in pediatrics. What makes this field of audiology so attractive in your eyes?

Stacey Rich:  Pediatrics was a natural choice for me. I’ve always wanted to work with kids. I’m very at ease with them. My first job was in a large pediatric hearing center. I got to see the kids and their parents every couple of months, and I enjoyed watching them grow up over the years. You really build a relationship with those families and their kids. With newborn screenings becoming more established over the years, we have learned what a difference early detection and intervention can make. I love seeing what kids can achieve when we give them the absolute best access to sounds as early as possible especially for families that choose spoken language as their primary communication mode. This gives them access to spoken language, allows them to more easily interact with their family and build strong relationships that support developmental outcomes.

AudiologyOnline: Phonak has just launched Phonak SkyTM Marvel, its latest solution for children. Which are the main new features and how do kids benefit especially from the latest Marvel technology?

Stacey Rich: Phonak Sky™ Marvel is designed, inside and out, for children. With three world’s first innovations including our pediatric automatic which was introduced in 2016, Sky Marvel offers clear rich sound, direct connectivity to smartphones and Roger™ mics (and so much more) and a rechargeable model. For me, the most revolutionary feature is RogerDirect™ which allows Roger to be wirelessly installed in any Sky Marvel hearing aid and means children no longer need to wear an additional receiver or neckloop in order to access the benefits of Roger technology.

AudiologyOnline: Digitalization is one of the buzz words in our industry today. Do you think that features like direct streaming of phone calls and music or apps can help overcome the stigma and turn hearing aids into cool gadgets, especially for a younger target group?

Stacey Rich:  I think most importantly, direct streaming gives children with hearing loss more access than ever before and yes, it does take a big step towards increasing the ‘cool factor’ for hearing aids. 

AudiologyOnline: You are a mother of a toddler yourself. Has motherhood changed the way you look at your job? 

Stacey Rich: I have always had a great passion for my job, but since becoming a mother myself there is an increased level of emotion in what I do, and I think I relate more to parents and what they may be feeling. On the other hand, my job has certainly influenced me as a mother. Through my work, I have learned that a child needs to hear 45 million words by the time they get to school in order to really prepare for academic success, which equates to about 30,000 words a day. In my first months with a new baby, I realized that 30,000 words is indeed a lot…One day I overheard my mom telling friends “She’s always, really always talking to the baby.” But back and forth interactions are even more important than the number of words a child hears. We have as many great conversations as possible throughout every day. She definitely keeps me laughing.

Learn more about what drives Stacey in her daily work and her current projects: https://audiologyblog.phonakpro.com/faces-of-audiology/staycey-rich

anniversary sweepstakes | 20 winners | Each course you take this month = 1 chance to win a FREE 1-year membership! |


stacey rich

Stacey Rich, MClAud, CCP

Stacey joined the Phonak's Pediatric and FM School Team in late 2008. She currently covers North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Ohio, Kentucky and East Tennessee. She previously worked for a government funded hearing services provider in Australia as a Pediatric Audiologist, fitting infants and children and also providing ongoing support to families, schools and early intervention agencies. She holds a B.S. in Education of Deaf Children from The University of NC at Greensboro and a Master of Clinical Audiology from The University of Melbourne in Australia.